Archive for February, 2010

wintertime in the city

So I had my camera with me today. After work, I took the bus and got off at the National Theater station and decided to walk to where I’d meet up with Knut for a tapas dinner. Along the way, I played tourist and took shots of Oslo in the wintertime. I realized I haven’t done it yet this year. Today is the mildest, at -4°c to -2°c, in a long bout of subzero temperatures. So the snow on the ground turned into slush, poor Dolce boots.

Anyway, here’s Oslo today.

By the National Theater

Skating rink on Spikersuppa

Karl Johan between the National Theater and the Parliament Building

The Royal Palace at one end of Karl Johan

The Grand Hotel on Karl Johan

The Parliament Building

Parliament Square, locally known as Dasslokket after the underground toilets in the middle of the square

Alice in (Winter) Wonderland? Her legs are inside the manhole.

New shopping center Eger, which stocks Helmut Lang, Alexander McQueen, Marc Jacobs, and J.Lindeberg among others. Oslo’s first Nespresso boutique is also located here.

Egertorget (Eger Square) with the landmark Freia (chocolate-maker) neon sign and clock display.

Oslo’s first and only Hermes boutique, at the first floor of luxury department store Steen & Strøm.

The Oslo Cathedral

Stortorvet or the Grand Square

King Christian IV on Stortorvet

We are leaving Oslo tomorrow morning on an emergency trip to middle Norway. We were able to book train tickets and hotel room tonight. I hope things will go well…

Have a nice weekend guys!

the eagle has landed

From a land not so far away this parcel came. I can’t believe it was just sitting in the post office since February 18, and I didn’t even get any notice. Boo! But all’s well now, I’ve collected the box this afternoon and have used the bag while doing my grocery. Yes, it’s a bag. =)

I’ll do a proper reveal in the weekend as I need plenty of daylight to take photos. But look closely and you might just find a clue to what’s hiding inside. Ssssshh… =)

acne denim biker jacket

I’m loving these jackets from Acne, built like a typical leather biker with front heavy zip-closure, three zip front pockets and zippered sleeves, only it’s crafted in denim. It features epaulettes and lapels with push buttons. The back hemline is slightly longer, which can be folded and buttoned up.

They’re now available from Acne (1.695 DKK/€228/£200/$308), in black and blue colorways. Great for late spring and renegade summer days! See the model’s having the attitude already.

postcards from home

So I went home and checked my mailbox, hoping to find in there a parcel notice from the postal office. Instead, I got these two postcards from my nieces in the Philippines which they got from when they were on Corregidor Island.

With the way the world and the way we communicate are changing, postcards are of a dying breed. That’s why whenever I travel, I always send postcards to my family back home and buy a couple to keep for myself.

Nothing beats a hand-written note, an exciting story told in a three-by-five-inch writing space. Sometimes you had too much to write your words bleed into the edge. Or sometimes you had too little to write you draw suns or flowers or hearts. Nothing beats the romance of a picture-perfect postcard traveling thousands of miles just to reach you. Sometimes, you’ll even see the crease from when the card was put into the postal box slot, or a silly little smudge from a postman’s blackened fingers. Nothing beats the notion that at one time in one person’s journey, they thought of you – wishing you were there. Nothing beats that no matter the time, no matter the place, a postcard is something you can put on your refrigerator door or keep in your carved wooden box case. A postcard is eternal. For as long as you cherish it.

When did you last send one?

a magazine curated by: maison martin margiela

If you haven’t gotten a whiff of it yet, the iconic A MAGAZINE Curated by Maison Martin Margiela, the No.1 issue of the bi-annual A MAGAZINE first released in 2004, has now been made available online.

A MAGAZINE explores the creative sphere of a selected designer in each issue. A guest curator – an international fashion designer, group or house – is invited to develop innovative, personalised content that expresses their aesthetic and cultural values. Each issue celebrates this designer’s ethos: their people, their passion, their stories, emotions, fascinations, spontaneity and authenticity.

In 2009 to celebrate the fifth birthday of A MAGAZINE, a new website and the A BLOG CURATED BY was launched. Throughout the month of February and beyond, A BLOG explores Maison Martin Margiela’s truly iconic magazine – an organic and interpersonal study of the brilliant people who have touched the house in weird and wonderful ways over its two decades in operation. Centred on both Antwerp and Paris, the contributions within the title include handwritten notes, typed working documents, collages, photography, interviews and installation art from the likes of Mark Borthwick, Marina Faust, BLESS, Ronald Stoops, Nigel Bennett and Patrick Scallon. Many contributors have not only been associated with the house externally, but have worked behind its closed doors as designers, models, photographers etc.

This issue also featured a DIY spread on how to make your own Margiela sweater. In a simplified version of the techniques of the Margiela Artisanal team, this sixteen step diagram shows you how to transform eight pairs of white socks into a sweater – cutting and stitching the footwear into a ribbed, stretch cotton jumper with the sock ‘heels’ creating unusual details on elbows and shoulders.

Other designers with their own curated A MAGAZINE you’ll see below, with the Proenza Schouler issue aimed to be released simultaneously in print and online in early (March) 2010.

Happy clicking/reading!

louis vuitton anniversary monogram denim shawl

Is it wrong to like the Louis Vuitton Anniversary Monogram Denim Shawl in Bleach Rose? Tee hee.

I give it to Bagaholicboy for always feeding/teasing me with the latest from Louis. He likes the one in Bleach Bleu. Go!

have you seen her?

So I was having my Valentine strawberry cheesecake and double latte over at Wayne’s Coffee and picked up the latest issue of Conde Nast Traveller. Flipping the cover page, I saw her on a two-page spread, lit like a porcelain-skinned girl off a Vermeer painting.

The Seamstress with Linen Thread and Beeswax.

A needle, linen thread, beeswax and infinite patience protect each overstitch from humidity and the passage of time. One could say that a Louis Vuitton bag is a collection of details. But with so much attention lavished on every one, should we only call them details?

Doing a quick search online, I found two other images from the same campaign.

The Craftsman with his Brush.

In a Louis Vuitton shoe there is, of course, quality you can see: superb materials, an impeccable finish and perfect proportions. But other qualities remain unseen: the craftsman’s skill and the simple elegance of his gestures, repeated so often and precisely. Not forgetting the final touch: a coat of dark paint to protect the sole and enhance the beauty of every step.

The Young Woman and the Tiny Folds.

In everything from Louis Vuitton, there are elements that cannot be fully explained. What secret little gestures do our craftsmen discreetly pass on? How do we blend innate skill and inherent prowess? Or how can five tiny folds lengthen the life of a wallet? Let’s allow these mysteries to hang in the air. Time will provide the answers.

While the truth-in-advertising standard was raised in question by Business Week in a report on these ads by Louis Vuitton, I just like how these ads depart from the use of legendary pop stars or Hollywood icons. Or of Lara Stone posed teasingly like the temptress snake in the garden of Eden.

And every now and then, we need a little stroke of romance behind the products we buy. That at one point or another, the bag we carry or the shoe we put on has been touched, hand-finished and brushed by a skilled artisan at a workshop on a French countryside.

After all, when we buy a Louis Vuitton, we buy a dream, a love story. And at other times, more than we’d like to admit, we buy an illusion.


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